Unofficial
Advising Information
for future engineering majors now at TCC

from Dr. James Carr
Office: SM 290
Phone: 201-8971

Office hours   can be found here   along with E-mail addresses
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Last updated: 25 March 2014

NEWEST! Essential Pre-engineering advising information.
(link to 60 kb pdf file that opens in new window)
This file presents a compact summary of what you need to know
about preparing for the FAMU-FSU and UF engineering programs.

Complete notes from Spring 2014 group advising session.
(link to 100 kb pdf file that opens in new window)
This file includes detailed information about the strict admission policies
at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and the UF College of Engineering.

Not so new: Notes from February 2010 talk by TCC alumni.
(link to 210 kb pdf file that opens in new window)
This file contains advice from students currently taking classes at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

General Engineering admission rules: PDF file of my Advising Info for Engineering Majors

Transfer and admission policies were checked in March 2014.
Check with your transfer college to confirm the policies that apply to you.


Specifically for FAMU and FSU students: PDF file of admissions policies for FAMU-FSU
Note: The "provisional admission" policy no longer applies to transfer students.

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Special Academic Alert for future engineers:

Engineering schools require a high level of proficiency in science (physics and chemistry) and math (algebra, trig, and calculus). Every accredited program has rigid standards concerning the minimum acceptable grades in "core" science and math courses, the number of attempts (rarely more than two) allowed to earn that acceptable grade, whether withdrawals are counted as attempts or not, and the "core" and overall GPA required.

In general, you are expected to pass each class in chemistry, physics, and calculus on the first attempt, although single repeats of a failing grade or withdrawal are usually (but not always) acceptable. Multiple repeats are seldom acceptable because they indicate an inability to handle technical challenges that will not be tolerated once you are in an engineering school. All attempts at any institution you attend are counted, not just ones at TCC.

The highly restrictive rules described here only apply to those seeking a degree from a College of Engineering that can lead to a Professional Engineer license.

These rules do not apply if you want to major in "Civil Engineering Technology" or "Electrical Engineering Technology" in the College of Engineering Sciences, Technology, and Agriculture at FAMU. Those "engineering technology" programs only require a passing grade for PHY2048 on your transcript. They also don't apply to "Construction Engineering Technology" at FAMU, which only requires PHY1053 rather than PHY2048, or the TCC "AS" programs in engineering technology that do not require physics at all.

Please click here and read some general suggestions and warnings.

To save space, nine specific examples of how those apply to persons wishing to major in engineering are on a separate page. Click here to read those comments.

Scroll to the bottom for links to info on some of the engineering schools at state universities in Florida. (still under construction)

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Admission Requirements

Florida State or FAMU:
The FAMU-FSU College of Engineering has the same admission policy regardless of whether you enter through FAMU or FSU. Any student enrolling at, or transferring to, FAMU or FSU after Spring 2006 is governed by the following policy: You must earn a "C" or above in each of four courses (CHM1045, MAC2311, MAC2312, and PHY2048 for most majors; CHM1045, CHM1046, MAC2311, and MAC2312 for chemical engineers) with no more than a single repeat of a failing grade in only one of those four courses. A student with a second repeat of a failing grade will be admitted provisionally and must earn a specific grade in a specific course on their first graded attempt to be admitted. A student with three failing grades, in any combination, will NOT be admitted. Every grade earned at every college or university the student has attended is counted, but withdrawals are NOT considered attempts. There are no exceptions to this policy. I will explain that policy to anyone who is interested, but you can also read it for yourself in the on-line FSU Catalog and/or from some of the links above and below.

Florida:
Effective January 2009, the University of Florida College of Engineering will no longer admit every student that has a 3.0 overall GPA and meets their "tracking" course requirements. According to the UF transfer student advisor, state budget cuts have resulted in quotas for each department in the college that will be filled on a competitive basis. They still require a minimum 2.5 GPA in their "tracking" courses (what I refer to as the "core" science and math curriculum). You must have passed 6 of those 8 classes (MAC2311, MAC2312, MAC2313, MAP2302, PHY2048+L, PHY2049+L, CHM1045+L, and another science class specific to your major) to be considered for admission. Some majors require a minimum grade of B in any physics or math class. You get a maximum of two attempts at each "tracking" class, but anything on your transcript (D, F, W, AW) is considered an attempt. That is, Florida counts a withdrawal as an attempt. Links below give more information. They recommend that you complete all 8 "tracking" courses before transfer.

Additional Information:
I have recently added a link to a pdf file containing the PowerPoint notes developed for a Summer 2009 group advising session. Those notes elaborate on some of these admission rules, and highlight other requirements for these and other schools in the state. You should also read the other two files linked up at the top of this page.

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Basic Scheduling Options

Starting Calculus in the summer, with grades of B or above in trig and pre-calc on the first attempt.

Summer Fall Spring Summer
MAC2311 MAC2312
PHY2048
MAC2313
PHY2049
MAP2302

Starting Calculus in the fall, with grades of B or above in trig and pre-calc on the first attempt. I do not recommend this schedule for students who had to repeat either trig or pre-calc or who got a C in those easy classes. I also don't recommend it for students who took MAC2311 in the summer and have to repeat it in the fall.

Fall Spring Summer Fall
MAC2311
PHY2048
MAC2312
PHY2049
MAP2302 MAC2313
+ Dual Enroll at FSU

Starting Calculus in the fall, with weaker grades in trig and pre-calc (a C or needed to repeat one of them). Please note that the spring semester load shown here could be too much for students who only got a C in MAC2311 while taking it all by itself and is not recommended for any student who had to repeat MAC2311.

Fall Spring Summer Fall
MAC2311 MAC2312
PHY2048
MAP230s MAC2313
PHY2049

Starting Calculus in the spring, with grades of B or above in trig and pre-calc on the first attempt. Please note that MAC2312 in the 10-week summer term is a full load.

Spring Summer Fall Spring
MAC2311
PHY2048
MAC2312 MAC2313
PHY2049
MAP2302
+ Dual Enroll at FSU

Starting Calculus in the spring, with weaker grades in trig and pre-calc (a C or repeated one of them). Please note that MAC2312 in the 10-week summer term is a full load.

Spring Summer Fall Spring
MAC2311 MAC2312 MAC2313
PHY2048
MAP2302
PHY2049

Something like this last plan could be appropriate for a future Chemical Engineer who needs to take two semesters of organic chemistry after CHM1045 and CHM1046. You want to take those four classes in sequence, so fit them in with MAC2311 and MAC2312 before taking physics. I definitely do NOT recommend taking organic chemistry, calculus, and physics at the same time.

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Detailed Course Scheduling Info

NOT YET UPDATED!

There are many different course schedules that can work for you, but different ones are needed for different programs. In addition, work load and preparation will affect how you build your schedule. Because of the many options, I have several separate pages that outline how you might put your plan together.